​​by E.N. Anderson
Understanding Food and Culture
Everyone eats, but rarely do we ask why or investigate why we eat what we eat. Why do we love spices, sweets, coffee? How did rice become such a staple food throughout so much of eastern Asia? Everyone Eats examines the social and cultural reasons for our food choices and provides an explanation of the nutritional reasons for why humans eat, resulting in a unique cultural and biological approach to the topic. E. N. Anderson explains the economics of food in the globalization era, food’s relationship to religion, medicine, and ethnicity as well as offers suggestions on how to end hunger, starvation, and malnutrition.Everyone Eats feeds our need to understand human ecology by explaining the ways that cultures and political systems structure the edible environment.

​​by David Bornstein
The Story of the Grameen Bank
The Price of a Dream tells the remarkable story of the Grameen Bank, the groundbreaking “village bank” that has revolutionized the way people around the world fight poverty. The Bank’s model–providing collateral-free “micro-loans” for self-employment to millions of women villagers in Bangladesh–has inspired and shaped the thinking of economists, policy makers, business people, development workers and a generation of social entrepreneurs. Both liberal and conservative policy circles have championed the Bank’s ability to transform the lives of its clients and help them escape the vicious cycle of deep economic hardship.

by David Bornstein and Susan Davis
What Everyone Needs to Know
In development circles, there is now widespread consensus that social entrepreneurs represent a far better mechanism to respond to needs than we have ever had before–a decentralized and emergent force that remains our best hope for solutions that can keep pace with our problems and create a more peaceful world. Bornstein and Davis explain what social entrepreneurs are, how their organizations function, and what challenges they face. The book will give readers an understanding of what differentiates social entrepreneurship from standard business ventures and how it differs from traditional grant-based non-profit work.

​by Trisha Carter and Rachel Yates
A Guided Journal For Adapting to Life Overseas
Let’s be honest: expat life can be tough. Although exciting, exhilarating and enriching, it can also be one of the greatest challenges you face. Get the tools you need to succeed in this guided journal, created by Trisha Carter (cross cultural psychologist), and Rachel Yates (expatriate resource developer). In a world where the rules are different, the environment unfamiliar and your support network far away, they will guide you through the process to a successful overseas relocation. Whether this is your first, your fourth or your final move, you too can find your home abroad.

by Anne P. Copeland and Georgia Bennett
The Answers to Newcomers’ Most Frequently Asked Questions
This valuable book guides newcomers from around the world through the challenges of understanding the US school system, from pre-school through high school. Written by two internationally-known experts in international relocation and education, this thorough but user-friendly guide is packed with information not found in any other single source. The Third Edition includes all the latest statistics and web sites, new international comparisons, plus an extended chapter on High School Issues.

​​by Anne P. Copeland and Marissa Lombardi
Intercultural Meaning in Everyday Stories
A collection of stories written by people who have moved to the United States from another country and culture. In the authentic, personal, everyday moments portrayed here and the commentary that accompanies each story, we gain precious access to the thinking and action behind the value differences that reveal themselves at work and in our daily lives. The writers describe the universal experience of those who find themselves in a new country, and reveal the intricacies and challenges of living and working across cultures. Whether you are an educator, learner, or trainer, these stories are a valuable tool for understanding the process of cultural value formation and intercultural transition.

​​by Elizabeth Gilbert
One Woman’s Search for Everything Across Italy, India, and Indonesia
In her early thirties, Elizabeth Gilbert had everything a modern American woman was supposed to want–husband, country home, successful career–but instead of feeling happy and fulfilled, she felt consumed by panic and confusion. This wise and rapturous book is the story of how she left behind all these outward marks of success, and of what she found in their place. Following a divorce and a crushing depression, Gilbert set out to examine three different aspects of her nature, set against the backdrop of three different cultures: pleasure in Italy, devotion in India, and on the Indonesian island of Bali, a balance between worldly enjoyment and divine transcendence.

​​by Erving Goffman
Essays on Face-to-Face Behavior
From the exemplary opening essay of Interaction Ritual, “On Face-Work,” —a full account of the extraordinary repertoire of maneuvers we employ in social encounters in order to “save face”—to the final, and classic, essay “Where the Action Is,”—an examination of people in risky occupations and situations: gamblers, criminals, coal miners, stock speculators—Goffman astounds us with the unexpected richness and complexity of brief encounters between people. For Goffman, as for Freud, the extreme cases are of interest because of the light they shed on the normal: The study of the trapeze artist is worthwhile because each of us is on the wire from time to time.

​​by Alberto González, Marsha Houston, and Victoria Chen
Essays in Culture, Ethinicity, and Communication
Our Voices: Essays in Culture, Ethnicity, and Communication examines intercultural communication through an array of cultural and personal perspectives, with each of its contributors writing a first-person account of his or her experiences in the real world. While most readers are collections of scholarly essays that describe intercultural communication, Our Voices presents short, student-oriented readings chosen with an eye toward engaging the reader. Collectively, the readings tackle the key areas of communication–rhetoric, mass communication, and interpersonal communication–using a uniquely expansive and humanist perspective that provides a voice to otherwise marginalized members of society. Praised by students for its abundance of short, first-person narratives, Our Voices traverses topics as diverse as queer identity, racial discourse in the United States, “survival mechanisms” in Jamaican speech, and codes of communication in nontraditional families.

​​by Linda A. Janssen
Engage, Adapt and Thrive Across Cultures
Living abroad offers enriching experiences of growth, broadened perspective, enhanced cultural understanding. Yet its transition-rich, change-driven, cross-cultural nature can place considerable demands, leaving us stressed, disconnected, our identity in flux. Building on existing literature and benefitting from recent developments in psychology and brain-body connections, The Emotionally Resilient Expat: Engage, Adapt and Thrive Across Cultures shows the key to successful transitions and beyond lies in emotional resilience to adapt, adjust or simply accept. Linda A. Janssen combines candid personal stories from experienced expats and cross-culturals, with a wealth of practical tools, techniques and best practices from emotional, social and cultural intelligence, positive psychology, mindfulness, stress management, self-care and related areas.

​​by John P. Kotter
From the ill-fated dot-com bubble to unprecedented M&A activity to scandal, greed, and ultimately, recession—we’ve learned that widespread and difficult change is no longer the exception. It’s the rule.
John Kotter’s now-legendary eight-step process for managing change with positive results has become the foundation for leaders and organizations across the globe. By outlining the process every organization must go through to achieve its goals, and by identifying where and how even top performers derail during the change process, Kotter provides a practical resource for leaders and managers charged with making change initiatives work. Leading Change is widely recognized as his seminal work and is an important precursor to his newer ideas on acceleration published in Harvard Business Review.

​​by Andrea Martins and Victoria Hepworth
50 Answers to Your Real-Life Questions about Living Abroad
If you have ever wondered what it is like to live abroad, work abroad or accompany your working partner abroad, this book is for you. If you are already living the expat life but have mixed emotions about settling in, rebuilding your identity, relationship changes, successfully managing your money and career, raising children far from home or repatriating, this book is also for you. In Expat Women: Confessions – 50 Answers to Your Real-Life Questions about Living Abroad, experienced expats Andrea Martins and Victoria Hepworth share a wealth of wisdom and positive tips to motivate you at every stage of your expat journey. They cover popular topics like leaving family back home, transitioning quickly, intercultural relationships, parenting bilingual children and work-life balance. They also address more difficult issues such as expat infidelity, divorce, alcoholism and reverse culture shock. This unique book is the perfect addition to every expat bookshelf.

​by Robin Pascoe
Parenting Abroad in an On-Demand World
A lot has changed since well-known Canadian author Robin Pascoe wrote Culture Shock! A Parent’s Guide. The world has become globalized, digitalized, and sadly, terrorized. That’s the big picture that Pascoe examines in Raising Global Nomads. In her own life, the author’s day job raising her two children has ended as her daughter begins a career as an environmental activist and her son heads to university. In her fifth book for expatriate families, the author recounts with honesty and trademark humour what worked for her family and shares the hard lessons learned. Parenting styles in general, and of third culture kids in particular, have changed dramatically, prompting this timely and comprehensive reexamination of the challenges of parenting abroad.

​by David C. Pollock and Ruth E. Van Reken
Growing Up Among Worlds
For more than a decade, Third Culture Kids has been the authority on “TCKs”– children of expatriates, missionaries, military personnel and others who live and work abroad. With a significantpart of their developmental years spent outside of their passport country, TCKs create their own, unique “third” cultures. Authors Pollock and Van Reken pioneered the TCK profile, which brought to light the emotional and psychological realities that come with the TCK journey, often resulting in feelings of rootlessness and grief but also in increased confidence and ability to interact with many cultures.Highlighting dramatic changes brought about by instant communication and ever-evolving mobility patterns, Third Culture Kids reveals the hidden diversity in our world and challenges our traditional notions of identity and “home”– and shows us how the TCK experience is becoming increasingly common and valuable.

​by Craig Storti
Whether in business, education, or diplomacy, anyone can be blindsided by a lack of international experience. In this expanded edition, The Art of Crossing Cultures shows what it takes to encounter a new culture head-on and succeed. Through the writings of the world’s greatest thinkers, Craig Storti paints a portrait of the challenges and triumphs of adjusting to another culture.

​​by Muhammad Yunus
The New Kind of Capitalism that Serves Humanity’s Most Pressing Needs
Muhammad Yunus, the practical visionary who pioneered microcredit and, with his Grameen Bank, won the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, has developed a new dimension for capitalism which he calls “social business.” The social business model has been adopted by corporations, entrepreneurs, and social activists across the globe. Its goal is to create self-supporting, viable commercial enterprises that generate economic growth as they produce goods and services to fulfill human needs. In Building Social Business, Yunus shows how social business can be put into practice and explains why it holds the potential to redeem the failed promise of free-market enterprise.